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Q and A

Jan 31, 2011; your pal, Khufu Asks:

Are you aware of the singing duo Garfunkel and Oates? Do you think that, after you have checked them out on YouTube, you will like any of their songs better than "Weed Card," which would seem to apply to you, as of April? And, finally, do you appreciate how scrupulously I have adhered to the question format?

Stacey answers:

Hi pal. I was not aware of the singing duo Garfunkel and Oates and had to check them out on YouTube. Thanks for the intro--they're great! I like how they have an A+ drama student/band geek vibe that is annoying at first but then quickly becomes endearing with a kind of push-pull, performance-art complexity. I like almost all their songs better than "Weed Card," which comes a little close to making fun of sick and obese people for my taste (in my world it's okay to make fun of everyone, but the closer you get to real suffering, the funnier it better be). I like "Gay Boyfriend" better; "One Night Stand" is good too. And finally, I have great admiration for how scrupulously you've adhered to the question format. It's hard, I know. I always want to put questions in my answers, but what's the point of that?

Jan 25, 2011; Khufu Asks:

OMG, izzit Oscars time again? Have you seen any movie at all in the last year (or five) that you felt was anything more than a waste of your time, an insult to your intelligence or glossy pandering to your lowest emotional common denominator?

Stacey answers:

Good question, Khufu. The only movies I saw last year were The American, Get Him to the Greek, and the terrible, infuriating Inception--purportedly about dreams but how could this be when it had no bathrooms, parents, tests, cars, or sex in it? I actually used to love movies but then I stopped loving them. I'm not sure if this is about movies or me because I also used to love music and going out to dinner--both things I'd rather avoid now. Also travel and people.

I'm sure there are still lots of good movies out there. It's kind of an amazing form of art/entertainment--so engrossing, so weird in a way. We think that we understand movies instinctively but really we don't--I don't mean the plots, I mean the cuts and lighting and time-warps and juxtaposition and all that. One of the last movies I took my grandmother to was The Usual Suspects. I think she was 97 and after ten minutes I realized that she couldn't really follow it because the cuts were so fast and disjointed and stylized. My grandmother loved movies, but she was born in 1906 and was never going to be able to put together a stream of disjointed images the way a person steeped in the rules of modern imagery could. Younger people just get it--we've spent our lives learning how to.

Movies really do teach us how to see, how to make meaning out of pictures. They influence our dreams; not just the content, but the form. They totally influence fiction too--all writing really. All those short sections with white space in between, all the jumping from one scene to another--you won't find much of this in 19th century novels. All this amazes me but no longer compels me very much. Also my back really hurts and has for a long time: sitting is not good. I think this is the main reason I don't like movies, or dinners out, or even music in some strange way. Pain pretty much neutralizes pleasure; it does this on an unconscious level, like shocking a rat when it eats a grape. After a while, the rat's just not that into grapes.

But maybe I'll get a chance to retrain my unconscious. In Arizona, there's a new thing. It's called medical marijuana. Cards will be available in April. I don't know if weed is going to make my back feel better but it might help me like music, movies, and food again. At least M&M's.

Check back though because if I think of any movies I liked in the past five years I'm going to list them. Black Swan sounds hilarious! I hear it has a girl masturbating with her stuffed animals, which is kind of sweet too.

Jan 11, 2011; Gali Asks:

Richter--that's Jewish isn't it? Did you know that you have a G-dly soul and an animal soul? You do, believe it or not. (check out Tanya at your local Chabad--they'll tell you all about it...) Which of your souls writes you stories? It's quite animal yet G-dly in it's striving. Nothing like a good paradox.

Stacey answers:

Mom? Is that you?

Jan 08, 2011; just newly discovered your edgy awesomeness :D Asks:

Hey Stacey, I am in an intro to fiction class, and read two of your short stories in the book, Doubletakers. they were The Beauty Treatment and The Cavemen in the Hedges, though you probably already know that haha, and i really just thought that the cavemen story was so ...forgive my lack of a better term but weird? i loved it, first of all, but i surprisingly just dont get it in a way? like i have my thoughts on what it means, you know the "between the lines" meaning, but since you are the writer, i wanted to ask you : what did the story mean? why did you write it or like what is it really about? Oh i just remembered my main question! did Kim have an affair with the red bandana cavemen or was she just hanging out? i dont get what was she doing in that basement??? XD thank you!^^ Brittany PS, The Beauty Treatment? LOVED. i read it, and then i read it out loud to my sister in law. So good. Kind of saddening when Katie became Katie again and wasnt the Bitch anymore, because i loved how she was The Bitch hehe.

Stacey answers:

I like to think that the cavemen were worshiping Kim as a goddess. But I tried to leave it open to interpretation.

Jan 03, 2011; Someone you least suspect.............. because it just seems too obvious that it's me. Asks:

What drives someone to sit and write "literary fiction" for hours on end, monotonously proofreading and editing and rewriting and blah blah blah, just so he or she can reach an ever-dwindling literary-fiction readership? Or, more concisely, what motivates someone to go through the arduous task of writing something they believe others will find worthwhile?

Do you believe there is a singular, central motivation that almost all writers have? Is there a few? Is there a whole variety of motivations, with none really being predominant over the others?
Usually, I'd put a little joke here, for levity's sake, but I don't want to become too predictable.

Sincerely yours (whoever I may be),
Someone

Stacey answers:

Hi Liam.
I had a long answer going in my head that was all about biology and anthropology and brain science and consciousness and dreams and shit, but now I just think I want to say: because it's fun. Yay, yay, proofreading! Yay, editing! Yay, yay, yay, yay! That's why I do it now, though when I started I did it because I was very, very angry. Also I thought it would somehow get me laid (?). The weird thing is that people are driven to do all sorts of extremely difficult, mostly unappreciated things that fall into the general category of "art." Just be glad you're not a musician. What could be more arduous than practicing the violin for five hours a day, from childhood, no kidding--like age five--just so you can get a poorly-paid job in an orchestra playing concerts for very, very old people who have hearing difficulties? But art compels us. Maybe it's a quest for truth and beauty, maybe it's the monkey-impulse to put things together, or a Freudian impulse to surpass our parents/get laid/transcend death, or a Jungian impulse to glimpse the divine. It's probably some combination of those; I'm not sure. Fun seems like as good an answer as any, even though most of the time, it's not really that fun.

Jan 02, 2011; madeleine like the cookie Asks:

Dear Stacey,

My favorite writers are you, Angela Carter, and Aimee Bender. What should I read next? Where are the other rad females writing fantastical, funny, eloquent, quirky stories? I mean you and Aimee are slow, and Angela Carter is dead since the eighties, I think.

Stacey answers:

Books! I think you'll love anything by Kelly Link (though I should tip you off that Pretty Monsters contains many stories published in her other books). Aimee Bender has a new novel that I haven't read yet, though I dreamed I read it and loved it. Definitely try There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor's Baby by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya--that one's wonderful, read that first--and while you're at it you'll also like the new anthology of modern fairy tales edited by Kate Bernheimer, irresistably entitled, My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me. That one is full of rad fantastical female authors--you can look up your favorites and zip off from there. And in honor of the cookie, I think you must read the strange, dreamy novel Madeleine is Sleeping by Sarah Shun-lien Bynun. For we must always honor the cookie.

Dec 12, 2010; Tom Brady, quarterback for the New England Patriots......................... okay, it's just Liam Asks:

Hey, Stacey. Do you follow any sports, professional or otherwise?

If yes, which one(s) and why?

If no, why not? If you were forced to follow/regularly watch a sport, which one(s) would you go with?

I hope you're well!

Your most valuable lickspittle,
Liam

Stacey answers:

No! Just, no no fucking no. I do sort of like professional ice skating though because it's pretty.

Dec 01, 2010; Lady Asks:

Are you one of those people who tapes their rejection letters to the bathroom wall? Do you advocate burning them? Do you keep them in a drawer? Do you throw them away?

Stacey answers:

Hi Lady. As it turns out, I wrote a piece about rejection letters for the Mississippi Review. I'll put a link to the reprint of it in Fictionaut. Please click up above on "Stories on the Web," then look for the piece called "The Chair of Rejection."

Nov 18, 2010; Wag Asks:

Do you think there were liberal and conservative cavemen?

Stacey answers:

Sort of, yeah, but actually probably not. I'm sure there were different philosophies of life among prehistoric humans, but as far as I can tell dualism is a more recent way of thinking. Modern people have gotten very into right and wrong, black and white, good and evil, all that. We started to have more rules once we started to live together in towns, and have culture, and grow food, though Eastern cultures aren't as dualistic as Western ones so maybe it's not inevitable, or even logical.

Probably, back in the days of hunter gatherers, people conceived of time and life as being cyclical, and that doesn't lend itself as easily to dualism. If you look at very early narratives, like The Epic of Gilgamesh, you can see the more cyclical notion of time in action. (Also, it's just a great boys' adventure story that's fun to read). And since hunter-gatherers didn't live in towns, they probably didn't really need as many ideas about how other people should live--since liberal and conservative is really about that in the end--not how one lives oneself, but how other people are supposed to live.

I'm just guessing! Well, duh.

Nov 11, 2010; Samantha Noel Asks:

Fantastic. Since I have entered a blog on here, I have read several of your pieces. I have made connections and found interesting ties into similar focuses you write about (piano, men singing). I look forward to reading more of your work. I've decided to focus on the relationship you make with your readers, your characters, and the relationship you have with your dual self (both as a reader and a writer).

I wonder, if you try to target a specific audience, our it just comes naturally.

Stacey answers:

That sounds good, Samantha. I don't think you'll be surprised to hear that most writers don't think of their relationship with readers in the same pointed way as academics. I'm really just trying to do the best I can--just like you do when you make things, even if you haven't made art since fourth grade. My ideas about audience seem to come after I write, not during, and have the distinct tinge of fantasy--so that now my ideal audience is 200,000 cute, smart boys. Though I really write for women. See? It makes no sense.

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